Sculptures Popping Out of Paintings

Oh, to have been in Tokyo in June! Shintaro Ohata just finished up a solo exhibition at the Yukari Art Contemprary in Tokyo, Japan. This Hiroshima, Japan-born artist is known for his ability to show us everyday life in a cinematic way. He captures light in his paintings, showering the world, as we know it, with carefully placed strokes of it. “Every ordinary scenery in our daily lives, such as the rising sun, the beauty of a sunset or a glittering road paved with asphalt on a rainy night, becomes something irreplaceable if we think we wouldn't be able to see them anymore,” he told Yukari gallery. “I am creating works to capture lights in our everyday life and record them in the painting."

More than that, this artist has a unique style. He places sculptures in front of paintings! Combining 2D with 3D, he’s an emerging young artist who’s definitely one to watch.

Straight from the Yukari gallery, here’s a sample of his stellar work.














Photos courtesy of Yukari Art Contemporary.



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