Thousands of Crayons Beautifully Form Pixelated Portraits

When creating his artwork, American artist Christian Faur does not utilize pure dabs of paint to create these Pointillist-style images. He uses simple crayons as the medium for his artwork, but not in the way that one might typically expect. Working with thousands of colorful wax sticks, Faur stands the crayons up and arranges the tips into pixelated patterns that form stunning portraits.

Some have equated Faur’s work to an interpretation of digital photography. The Kim Foster Gallery says that Faur replaces digital pixels with more than 145,000 crayons and that, “This expansion of the pixel allows us to see the structure and scaffolding behind the surface of an image, opening the viewer's eyes to the hidden patterns and complex arrangements of points that make up a photograph.”

As viewers move around the space and adjust their perspective, the visual experience of Faur’s work changes with the movement. The full image is best viewed from a distance, but up close is where the best understanding of the three dimensional piece can be most fully appreciated.

To see more work by other artists who utilize everyday materials in creative and unique ways, check out this top 20 list here.











Christian Faur’s website
via [My Eclectic Depiction of Life]



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