These Embroidered Vegetables Look Like They Were Plucked Straight From a Garden

Vegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono Kitsune

There's more than one way to grow a vegetable garden. Japanese artist @konekono_kitsune cultivates their own fresh produce using a needle and thread. From turnips to snap peas to bell peppers, their embroidery art is lush enough to fill a cornucopia.

All of these hand-stitched veggies are rendered with three-dimensional texture so that they better resemble their real-life counterparts. @konekono_kitsune shows off their accuracy by photographing every finished piece over their inspiration. For instance, their rendition of kale mimics the curly consistency of the leaves with tangles of different knots.

Additionally, many of @konekono_kitsune's finished works feature a composition with three illustrations of the vegetable. The artist uses this design to create a pleasing repeating pattern with slight variations to the plant, such as in the bend of the leaves or the angle of the crop. For example, their embroidery of a bell pepper features two whole veggies from different angles and one view of a cut piece with the seeds inside.

Scroll down to see more embroidery art by @konekono_kitsune, and follow the artist on Instagram to keep up to date with their latest work.

Japanese artist @konekono_kitsune creates embroidery art that looks like real vegetables.

Vegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneBroccoli Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono Kitsune

The artist often stitches a bundle of three next to each other, with slight variations in composition.

Vegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono Kitsune

Whether it's one or three thread illustrations, each leafy green is remarkably realistic.

Vegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono Kitsune

The embroidery features a wide range of veggies as well as a variety of stitches to mimic colors and textures.

Vegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono Kitsune

Though you can't eat these veggies, the good part is that they also don't require a green thumb to maintain.

Vegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono KitsuneVegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono Kitsune

This is what you could call a true feast for the eyes.

Vegetable Embroidery Art by Konekono Kitsunekonekono_kitsune: Instagram

All images via @konekono_kitsune.

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Margherita Cole

Margherita Cole is a Contributing Writer at My Modern Met and illustrator based in Southern California. She holds a BA in Art History with a minor in Studio Art from Wofford College, and an MA in Illustration: Authorial Practice from Falmouth University in the UK. When she’s not writing, Margherita continues to develop her creative practice in sequential art.
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