Pottery Barn Launches 150-Piece Furniture Collection Designed for People With Disabilities

Accessible Furniture at Pottery Barn

For those with a disability, design dramatically affects how they interact with the world. Seemingly small choices can improve quality of life. Take the height of a sink, for instance. For a person using a wheelchair, the height and construction of a vanity can make washing their hands an impossible task. Pottery Barn has just launched a furniture collection with this type of accessibility (and beyond) in mind. Geared towards the elderly, injured, and those living with disabilities, the company is one of the first large home brands to create an accessible furniture line.

Pottery Barn adapted 150 of its best-selling styles to make them easier to access, offering better mobility and comfort with a touch of a button. Its designers were guided by the Disability Education and Advocacy Network, an organization led by people with disabilities, as well as designers who specialize in designing for disabilities.

By combing the chic aesthetic of Pottery Barn with expert guidance, people who need modifications will now have access to the same stylish pieces. “We wanted to adapt our vernacular, our beautiful reclaimed-wood finishes, to these products,” Marta Benson, Pottery Barn’s president, explains. “You shouldn’t have to compromise design to have this functionality.”

Adapting some of the products were small tweaks. Mirrors, for instance, can now tilt. But there were some much larger changes for other pieces. Some of Pottery Barn’s most popular armchairs now have the ability to tilt and move in every direction. In doing this, the chairs are easier to get in and out of, and they relieve stress on the body.

The inclusive design comes with a caveat; the price point of Pottery Barn can be restrictive for many, particularly those with disabilities who historically have lower incomes. But there is reason for optimism. By the company developing its line of accessible home products, it will hopefully signal to other retailers to create furniture that’s both stylish and inclusive for people with different abilities.

Check out the entire accessible home Pottery Barn collection here.

Pottery Barn has just launched a collection of accessible furniture geared towards the elderly, injured, and those living with disabilities.

Accessible Furniture at Pottery BarnAccessible Furniture at Pottery Barn

The company worked with the Disability Education and Advocacy Network, an organization led by people with disabilities, as well as designers who specialize in designing for disabilities.

Accessible Furniture at Pottery BarnAccessible Furniture at Pottery Barn

It adapted 150 best-selling items to make them more accessible while maintaining a chic aesthetic.

Accessible Furniture at Pottery BarnAccessible Furniture at Pottery BarnPottery Barn: Website | Instagram  | Facebook 
h/t: [Fast Company]

All images via Pottery Barn.

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Sara Barnes

Sara Barnes is a Staff Editor at My Modern Met, Manager of My Modern Met Store, and co-host of the My Modern Met Top Artist Podcast. As an illustrator and writer living in Seattle, she chronicles illustration, embroidery, and beyond through her blog Brown Paper Bag and Instagram @brwnpaperbag. She wrote a book about embroidery artist Sarah K. Benning titled 'Embroidered Life' that was published by Chronicle Books in 2019. Sara is a graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art. She earned her BFA in Illustration in 2008 and MFA in Illustration Practice in 2013.
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