Home / Art / IllustrationRIP Qinni: Fans Pay Tribute to the Artist Who Inspired Them to “Paint the Stars”

RIP Qinni: Fans Pay Tribute to the Artist Who Inspired Them to “Paint the Stars”

 

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People across the world are mourning the loss of Canadian artist Qing Han, aka Qinni, who passed away from cancer at the young age of 29. Qinni—whose work you have probably seen and not even realized it—had a massive and enthusiastic online following after joining DeviantArt in the late 2000s. It was there that she first posted her fantastical, anime-inspired artwork and cultivated relationships with friends and fans online. Qinni was seen as someone generous with her time who not only shared inspiring work but showed how she created it through in-depth tutorials.

Qinni’s incredible talents and her ability to be vulnerable with her online community made her someone that artists looked up to. She was, in a way, paying it forward, as the community aspect is why she turned to DeviantArt in the first place. “I grew up in a family that disapproved of me doing art, so I wasn’t allowed to draw at home,” she wrote after receiving the site’s Deviousness Award in 2017. “DA was really the place where I got the encouragement and confidence to try and convince my parents I wanted to become a professional artist.” She achieved her goal and became a background painter for the animation studio Titmouse—in addition to creating her personal work. “I remember wanting to be just as skilled and well known as some of the artists here and it’s crazy to almost be able to see myself as their peer now. Sometimes I look back and I still reel at everything.”

Qinni was open about sharing her health issues and would provide updates about her struggles on her social media. She had undergone open-heart surgery four times due to a genetic heart condition, and just after Christmas, she announced on Twitter that she had received a terminal diagnosis of stage four fibrosis sarcoma cancer. While going through chemo, she continued to post art (that often related to the body) and share the nitty-gritty of her treatments. Each time, she was met with sympathy and support.

When Qinni’s passing was announced, fans began to mourn and pay tribute to this artistic force by creating art. The hashtag #galaxiesforqinni features many well-wishes for her as well as many recreations of one of her most popular pieces—Starred Freckles, in which jewel-toned girl with stars spread across her face. (The painting was so popular it inspired the “galaxy makeup” trend.)

Scroll down for heartfelt tribute art created by artists around the world in honor of Qinni.

Fans across the world are mourning the loss of Qinni, a Canadian artist who passed away from cancer at the age of 29.

 

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A post shared by Qing Han (@qinniart) on

Chances are that you’ve seen Qinni’s work without even realizing it. Starred Freckles is one of her most popular pieces.

She’s also responsible for this meme…

…as well as a plethora of beautiful work, which often dealt with the body.

 

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A post shared by Qing Han (@qinniart) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Qing Han (@qinniart) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Qing Han (@qinniart) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Qing Han (@qinniart) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Qing Han (@qinniart) on

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Qing Han (@qinniart) on

Her fans are now posting their tribute art using the hashtag #galaxiesforqinni.

 

Next: More Tribute Art for Qinni

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Sara Barnes

Sara Barnes is a Staff Editor at My Modern Met and Manager of My Modern Met Store. As an illustrator and writer living in Seattle, she chronicles illustration, embroidery, and beyond through her blog Brown Paper Bag and Instagram @brwnpaperbag. She wrote a book about embroidery artist Sarah K. Benning titled 'Embroidered Life' that was published by Chronicle Books in 2019. Sara is a graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art. She earned her BFA in Illustration in 2008 and MFA in Illustration Practice in 2013.

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