Rare Glimpse Into the Personal Life of Iconic James Dean

It’s fascinating to catch a glimpse into the personal life of someone as iconic as James Dean. This series by photographer Dennis Stock features a 1950s Dean in both New York City, lounging around his fifth-floor walk-up at 19 West 68th Street, and Fairmount, Indiana, visiting his hometown. At the time, the renowned actor was young and just discovering his success. Stock began this photojournalistic project because he was interested in documenting “the environments that affected and shaped the unique character of James Byron Dean” as the young man grew into his fame.

These black and white photographs are a beautiful portrayal of the actor as an average man, relaxing, reading, listening to records, and hanging out with his feet up. Though the recognizable image of the rebel walking in the rain with a cigarette dangling from his lips has become iconic, the young actor tragically died in a car crash at the age of 24 and gained this fame only after he died. He actually only stars in three films, two of which had not yet been released at the time of the accident.












Dennis Stock for LIFE magazine
via [This Isn’t Happiness], [Architectural Digest]



January 20, 2017

Floating Cabin Lets Nature-Lovers Sleep in the Treetops of Sweden

If you’ve ever dreamed of cuddling up in a contemporary treehouse, the 7th Room Treehotel may be your new favorite getaway. Designed by Snøhetta—a design office that dabbles in landscaping, architecture, interiors, and brand design—the floating bungalow is tucked away in Northern Sweden and perfectly positioned for a sweeping view of the Northern Lights. The 7th Room is elevated by twelve 10-meter stilts and is beautifully built around the towering trunk of a pine tree.

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January 20, 2017

19 Most Creative Water Fountains From Around the World

Water fountains have a long place in our history. Dating back to the Ancient Roman times, these reservoirs were first designed with a purely practical purpose—for holding precious drinking water and bathing. These early fountains were uncovered, free standing, and placed along the street for public consumption. (Wealthier folks also had them in their homes.)

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