Suspended Books Magically Fill Swiss Tunnel


Romainmtier is a small Swiss village that borders France. It is known for its modest population and picturesque town whose architecture is reminiscent of the Roman Empire. Like a small European village straight out of a movie, Romainmtier holds a charming annual used book fair that takes place at the town church, which is rich with Romanesque architecture. In 2005, Swiss artist Jan Reymond began constructing elaborate installations each year, made of the old, unsold books as a last hurrah for the soon-to-be discarded objects.

Many of Reymond’s book installations mimic the church and quaint town’s round arches and stained glass fixtures that are common to the design of the era it echoes. The artist constructs surreal architectural landscapes that would make anyone do a double-take. They fill the arched doorways and restructure the spaces they inhabit without altering the aesthetic appeal. His installation called Rosace takes a wide and high-ceiling passageway and fills it with his suspended books, leaving a rounded pathway of its own for passersby to cross through. Additionally, there is even a stained glass window imitation on the arch made of books and discarded microfilms.











Photos via:
Thomas Guignard and
overthemoon
via [arpeggia]





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