Swirling Liquids Form Spectacular Macro Artwork


Using a macro lens, UK-based photographer Janet Waters gets up close and personal with all kinds of liquids, bubbles, food dye, and soapy water. Where many artists like to have control of their final product, Waters actually counts on the unpredictable nature of liquids to create her captivating abstract designs.

Waters has an intense talent for finding the perfect angles of light to form interesting, tactile textures. The edges of simple bubbles resemble pieces of wire, small coins, or fancy jewelry. Originally a painter, the artist was never fully able to translate her ideas onto a canvas with acrylics or oils. Through photography, she uses what she calls “photographic paint,” which allows her to produce these spectacular compositions.

The images here are just a small collection of the hundreds of photographs that Waters has created. If you want to see more of her work, you can check out all of her liquids and bubbles, here. Also, if you enjoy this kind of photography, check out Sharon Johnstone’s macro dew drops and Jane Thomas’s colorful soaps.














Janet Waters on Flickr
via [PhotoJoJo]





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