Massive River of 10,000 Discarded Books Rages Through Melbourne

If you were in Melbourne this past June, you may have run into a gargantuan installation right on the city streets. For The Light in Winter festival, Spanish art collective Luzinterruptus was commissioned to create a work of art that, quite literally, stopped traffic. 10,000 discarded books, donated by public libraries and collected by the Salvation Army, were lit up and then arranged to look like a massive river overtaking the city. First created in New York, Literature vs Traffic was bigger and better this time, ultimately becoming their largest work to date.

On the final night of the installation, visitors were encouraged to take the books home with them. Luzinterruptus has just put out a blog post that shows the public’s curious and oftentimes joyful interaction along with some interesting behind-the-scenes shots. One can’t help but be impressed with how they managed to pull this whole idea off.
















Luzinterruptus’ website





December 2, 2016

Sexy French Farmers Pose for Shirtless 2017 Calendar

Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2018 edition: French farmers.

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December 1, 2016

Meticulous Landscape Paintings Beautifully Represent Intangible Emotional States

Artist Crystal Liu intimately ties her emotional states to beautiful abstract paintings. In large-scale works, she constructs landscapes that are metaphors for the intangible forces that drive us. Visually, elements of the Earth and sky are the actors for the feelings we cannot easily imagine. Together, the sun, mountains, and more depict “narratives of conflict, entrapment, longing, and precarious hope.” These symbols allow Liu to seem removed, yet make the pieces deeply personal.

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