Monumental Paper Architecture

Though paper isn’t ideal to build a sturdy structure to inhabit, it proves to be an excellent medium to produce exquisite representations of urban and exotic architecture. Amsterdam-based paper artist Ingrid Siliakus brings us these magnificent cityscapes cut out of paper in her Paper Architecture series. Built similar to pop-up books, many of the paper sculptures are capable of folding onto themselves or changing proportions, based on how obtuse or acute the angle of its binding is.

The amount of detail in each piece is remarkable. The different shapes and compositions in relation to one another bring each paper world to life, adding a personality to each construction. While some of Siliakus’ sculptures appear like 3D blueprints for a real city, others are far more surreal with the endless alignment of stairs and upside-down skylines. I’m curious to see what these architectural landscapes would look like in color, but am weary to change a thing about any of them because of how eye-catching they already are! If you are in the Netherlands, you can see many of the artist’s works on exhibition at Erve Kots until February 29, 2012.











Ingrid Siliakus’ website
via [Designboom]



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