Poland’s Mind-Melting Crooked House

You may recall the unusual architectural constructs created by photo manipulation expert Michael Jantzen and think you know better than to believe that such wacky, funhouse-like structures actually exist in this world, but think again. Krzywy Domek, translated as Crooked House, is a shopping center in Sopot, Poland that curves and slants for real! There’s no photo editing tools used to depict this unconventionally structured edifice.

Designed by Szotynscy & Zaleski, the multipurpose building boasts a unique look that was inspired by the fairy tale illustrations of Jan Marcin Szancer and Per Dahlberg. Like Jantzen’s imagined works, this venue has a cartoonish appeal. It looks like an animated house, bouncing in place to a jolly tune. There’s a jovial liveliness to the place that seems very inviting. How could a family not be drawn to the welcoming Crooked House?














Krzywy Domek website
Images via [etoday, lesica, annmag, Mikko Suominen, sylvia-mnchen, LeszekZadlo]





December 2, 2016

Sexy French Farmers Pose for Shirtless 2017 Calendar

Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2018 edition: French farmers.

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December 1, 2016

Meticulous Landscape Paintings Beautifully Represent Intangible Emotional States

Artist Crystal Liu intimately ties her emotional states to beautiful abstract paintings. In large-scale works, she constructs landscapes that are metaphors for the intangible forces that drive us. Visually, elements of the Earth and sky are the actors for the feelings we cannot easily imagine. Together, the sun, mountains, and more depict “narratives of conflict, entrapment, longing, and precarious hope.” These symbols allow Liu to seem removed, yet make the pieces deeply personal.

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