Wedding Photography Inspired by Paintings and Film Noir



Call it daring, dark, dramatic and even haunting. Just don’t call it unoriginal. This is the work of Rocco Ancora.

Popular Photography just released its list of their Top 10 Wedding Photographers of 2011 and it included the talented Melbourne, Australia-based photographer. Pop Photo calls the ten the “best in the business,” chosen for their art of creativity, adventure and individualism. “For decades, wedding photography was stilted and conventional,” says Aimee Baldridge, editor of Pop Photo. “But recently, an adventurous spirit rising in both couples and photographers has shifted the rules. Individuality is now key, whether that means bringing in landscape photography techniques, photojournalism or hipster style. No matter how edgy they may be, though, wedding photogs still need to get a shot of Nana dancing with her 7-year-old grandson.”

Out of the ten, what drew us to Rocco Ancora’s work was that his photos looked like paintings. This is, of course, on purpose. "I draw a lot from Renaissance art and Pre-Raphaelite paintings, and from Rembrandt and Vermeer," he explains. "I'm fascinated by the way they used light."

Ancora’s distinct style has been called classical and romantic. In addition to paintings, his photography is also inspired by old films from the ’40s and ’50s (like in the film noir genre).










Pop Photo and Rocco Ancora’s website



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