Zooming In and Out of New York


Madrid-based photographer Alfonso Zubiaga must know something we don’t. How else could he show us what a living, breathing New York City looks like? Sit back and enjoy as Zubiaga takes us over its busy streets and through its most recognizable landmarks. By zooming in and out of everything from New York’s iconic skyscrapers to its trademark yellow taxi cabs, he takes us on a wild ride that makes us feel like…in town where no one ever sleeps, one should never be sitting still!

What’s the background story? How did Zubiaga make these photos, you ask? He tells us that the series was all shot in 2008 and that the photos were taken from the Rockefeller Center, Empire State Building as well as all around Manhattan over the course of 10 days. Using a single image, he reconstructed it digitally by successive layering and by centering the image in the places that piqued his interest the most. Why New York? “I wanted to evoke the feeling of vertigo in the city,” he tells us. “New York is probably the most photographed city in the world, and my intention is to portray it in a different way than what has been done so far.”










Alfonso Zubiaga’s website

Related New York Photography:
New York City Sparkles at Night (20 photos)
New York is a White Wonderland (10 photos)
The Beautiful Brooklyn Blizzard (15 photos)





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