Sculpture of Jesus in Abandoned Cemetery Is Slowly Being Absorbed by a Tree

During the events of World War II, the small village of Łupków in Poland was almost completely destroyed. Today, only a few remnants of this small settlement remain, including the foundation of a church, a bell tower, and an abandoned cemetery. Unattended for decades, these markers have been reclaimed by nature in some amazing ways. One of the most interesting among them is a sculpture of Jesus that has been absorbed into the trunk of a tree.

Its distinctive style and pose suggest that this small, black statuette used to be a standard depiction of Jesus on the cross. However, the surrounding forest has slowly taken over this small piece, leaving only the head, torso, and thighs visible to the viewer. Nearby, wooden crosses that were used to indicate graves have also merged with trees, and headstones are camouflaged in moss and tall leaves. The last people to be buried at this lost cemetery were soldiers who fought in WWII.

Scroll down to see more haunting images of the earth reclaiming headstones, sculptures, and iconography.

In Łupków, Poland, a sculpture of Jesus is being slowly absorbed by a tree.

 

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A post shared by Łukasz Kaniewski (@lukaszkan)

This small village was almost completely destroyed during WWII, and only the remnants of a church, bell tower, and cemetery remain.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Ewelina Monach (@wildheart__e)

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h/t: [Reddit]

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Margherita Cole

Margherita Cole is a Contributing Writer at My Modern Met and illustrator based in Southern California. She holds a BA in Art History with a minor in Studio Art from Wofford College, and an MA in Illustration: Authorial Practice from Falmouth University in the UK. When she’s not writing, Margherita continues to develop her creative practice in sequential art.
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