Moving Reflective Eyeball Sculpture


Do you ever feel like someone's watching you? This incredible stainless steel eyeball sculpture by Moscow-based architecture firm SPeeCH Tchoban & Kuznetsov is capable of “looking” at all of its the visitors in its environment at the Cortile d'Onore of the Ca' Granda's courtyard. The high-tech sculpture, called Architect's Eye, is a smooth and reflective spherical structure emulating the human eyeball as its focus shifts from the sky to the ground to the rest of its surrounding area, with the pupils effectively dilating and contracting. The iris of the eye also has the mesmerizing ability to change color.

This visually inspired piece by Sergey Tchoban and Sergey Kuznetsov's architecture studio represents “legacy” as part of this year's Interni Legacy event at Milan Design Week by incorporating abandoned Russian monuments within the sculptural installation. In addition, the sphere's reflective surface serves as an excellent deforming device for the 18th-century courtyard that the piece is situated in and surrounded by. The sculpture is ultimately meant to symbolize an architect's most valuable organs (eyes) and the ability to discern visual designs throughout history and all walks of life around us.





SPEECH Tchoban & Kuznetsov website
via [Interni Magazine, CollabCubed]

Pinar

Pinar Noorata is the Managing Editor at My Modern Met. She is a writer, editor, and content creator based in Brooklyn, NY. She earned her BA in Film and Media Studies from CUNY Hunter College and is an alumni of the Center for Arts Education’s Career Development Program in NYC. She has worked at NBC Universal, Penguin Books, and the Tribeca Film Festival as well as many other independent media companies. When she isn’t writing, editing, or creating videos herself, Pinar enjoys watching movies—anything from foreign art house films to mainstream blockbusters.
Become a
My Modern Met Member
As a member, you'll join us in our effort to support the arts.
Become a Member
Explore member benefits

Sponsored Content

[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]