Getting Lost in a Great Novel


What could be better than curling up with a book and a hot cup of tea? After looking through photographer Joel Robison’s portfolio, it seems like nothing could compare. The Canada-based photographer, aka boywonder, appears to have a love affair with literature that reads (a little pun intended) through his work. There are a bevy of books that are at the forefront of his shots, working as props, scenery, architecture, and subjects.

In addition to books, Robison utilizes coffee mugs and teacups brilliantly. Whether indoors or outdoors, there is a homey presence that is associated with books and hot beverages. In a most impressive way, Robison manages to translate that cozy appeal with surreal imagery. The photographer’s vivid imagination shines through his images that seem to be heavily influenced by fictional tales. (If you look through the entirety of his portfolio, there are a number of visuals that are clearly inspired by Harry Potter.) Robison plays with size ratio and brings fantasy to life. Even in his series of works that don’t feature books or cups, there is a welcoming amalgamation of dreams and magic.















Joel Robison’s Flickr
via [Lustik]



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