Home / Art / Installation / Clever Rotating Mirror Installation Reflects Different Views of Venice’s Doge’s Palace

Clever Rotating Mirror Installation Reflects Different Views of Venice’s Doge’s Palace

Mirrors Reflecting the Doge's Palace in Venice

In an effort to transform our vision of well-worn architecture, French design Arnaud Lapierre has created a moving art installation in the heart of Venice. Using sixteen round mirrors that slowly turn in synchronicity, Lapierre breaks apart some of Venice's most famous buildings. These fragments then bounce back and completely disarm our sensibilities.

Lapierre's contemporary installation, AZIMUT, was originally installed on the Riva degli Schiavoni, just in front of the Doge's Palace, in late February. Though it's now been removed due to the current world crisis, Lapierre's documentation of the event is a powerful representation of the artwork. Through photographs and video, we see how AZIMUT profoundly impacts our perception of the environment.

As each mirror captures a different aspect of the urban landscape, these hulking pieces of architecture are broken down into digestible segments. In some ways, this makes them easier to take in, as different details are framed within the single mirrors and, therefore, our focus is directed. The slow, relaxing pace of the rotation draws us in, almost asking us to sit back and let the mirrors take the lead. By allowing them to do so, we're given the pleasure of gaining a new perspective on the environment.

Though the installation was cut short, Lapierre hopes to reschedule AZIMUT for another round in Venice at a later date. In the meantime, prepare to be mesmerized.

AZIMUT is a rotating mirror installation in Venice that plays with our perception of space.

Mirror Art Installation in VeniceTriangular Formation of Mirrors Reflecting the Sky in VeniceMirrors Reflecting the Doge's Palace in VeniceMirror Art Installation in St. Mark's Square Venice

By breaking up sites like the Doge's Palace, the installation directs our gaze to specific details…

Doge's Palace Reflected in Round MirrorsRound Mirrors Reflecting the Famous Monuments of Venice

…and helps us gain a new appreciation for these famous pieces of architecture.

Round Mirrors on the Ground Reflecting the Doge's PalaceVenetian Monuments Reflected in Round MirrorsRound Mirrors on the Ground Reflecting the Doge's Palace

Watch as AZIMUT rotates to take in the Venetian environment.

Arnaud Lapierre: Website | FacebookInstagram

My Modern Met granted permission to feature photos by Arnaud Lapierre.

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Jessica Stewart

Jessica Stewart is a Contributing Writer and Digital Media Specialist for My Modern Met, as well as a curator and art historian. She earned her MA in Renaissance Studies from University College London and now lives in Rome, Italy. She cultivated expertise in street art which led to the purchase of her photographic archive by the Treccani Italian Encyclopedia in 2014. When she’s not spending time with her three dogs, she also manages the studio of a successful street artist. In 2013, she authored the book 'Street Art Stories Roma' and most recently contributed to 'Crossroads: A Glimpse Into the Life of Alice Pasquini'. You can follow her adventures online at @romephotoblog.

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