Emotional Portrait of Mary of Nazareth Emerges From Exquisite High-Relief Sculpture

High Relief Sculpture by Dominik Wdoski

Poland-based artist Dominik Wdowski creates realistic high-relief sculptures that emerge from a two-dimensional background. One of his most recent works of art depicts an emotional Mary of Nazareth who turns toward the viewer at the moment she realizes she will become the mother of Jesus Christ.

Entitled Annuntiato (or annunciation), Wdowski spent over 18 months bringing this piece to life in plasticine clay. He used traditional methods to carefully render the details of the figure's face, hair, and dress until she appeared true to life. Her long locks cascade down one side of her back while other strands are blown against the flattened circular background. Mary's wide eyes are finely molded to include an iris and pupil, and she furrows her thin brows in a look akin to disbelief.

Wdowski based the portrait of Mary on the character from Franco Zefirelli's Jesus of Nazareth, played by actress Olivia Hussey. The artist wanted to maintain her likeness while interpreting the story from the Bible in a three-dimensional art form. Mary's bust is contained within a pendant-like shape reminiscent of a halo, perhaps inferring her holiness.

You can see Wdowski's figurative sculptures in person at Vlask art gallery in Gent, Belgium, and keep up to date with Wdowski's latest art by following him on Instagram.

Polish artist Dominik Wdowski created a magnificent high-relief sculpture.

High Relief Sculpture by Dominik WdoskiHigh Relief Sculpture by Dominik Wdoski

Entitled Annuntiato, it depicts Mary of Nazareth at the moment she realizes she will become the mother of Jesus Christ.

High Relief Sculpture by Dominik WdoskiDominik Wdowski: Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to feature photos by Dominik Wdowski.

Related Articles:

Illusionistic Sculptures Explore the Relationship Between Humans and Nature

Artist Manipulates Reality in Mind-Bending Surrealist Sculptures

Past and Present Clash in Striking Marble Sculptures That Appear to “Malfunction”

Margherita Cole

Margherita Cole is a Contributing Writer at My Modern Met and illustrator based in Southern California. She holds a BA in Art History with a minor in Studio Art from Wofford College, and an MA in Illustration: Authorial Practice from Falmouth University in the UK. When she’s not writing, Margherita continues to develop her creative practice in sequential art.
Become a
My Modern Met Member
As a member, you'll join us in our effort to support the arts.
Become a Member
Explore member benefits

Sponsored Content

[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]