A Colorful Floating City Is Being Constructed in the Maldives

Climate change means rising sea levels. For many island nations, this spells disaster. The Maldives—a beautiful archipelago in the Indian Ocean—is preparing for ways to meet this impending challenge. Breaking ground in 2022, Netherlands-based company Dutch Docklands is partnering with the Government of the Maldives to create a floating city. This Maldives Floating City will be a revolutionary solution to housing problems while also respecting the ecology of the region.

Dutch Docklands, the Maldives, and their architect Waterstudio have been planning the magnificent, colorful city for years. In a beautiful lagoon, 10 minutes by boat from Male, the Maldivian capital, will sit housing for 20,000. A flexible, floating, connected grid will rest in these largely protected waters. Coral reefs—natural and purpose grown—bring tranquility in harmony with nature. Even the shape of the city grid will mimic the structure of coral.

Houses, restaurants, shops, and schools will all have waterfront property along the winding canals which bend through the city plan. Home pricing will range upwards from $250,000. Known as a luxury vacation destination for the wealthy, the government and project developers hope that the price will be accessible to local citizens as well. Construction has begun, with the first residents expected to arrive in 2024.

Beyond a beautiful city, the project offers hope for future floating city developments which can alleviate overpopulation and solve the problem of flooding as sea levels rise. Former President of the Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed, said in a statement, “Our adaption to climate change mustn’t destroy nature but work with it, as the Maldives Floating City proposes. In the Maldives we cannot stop the waves, but we can rise with them.”

Breaking ground in 2022, Netherlands-based company Dutch Docklands is partnering with the Government of the Maldives to create a floating city.

This Maldives Floating City will be a revolutionary solution to housing problems while also respecting the ecology of the region.

h/t: [CNN]

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Madeleine Muzdakis

Madeleine Muzdakis is a Contributing Writer at My Modern Met and a historian of early modern Britain & the Atlantic world. She holds a BA in History and Mathematics from Brown University and an MA in European & Russian Studies from Yale University. Madeleine has worked in archives and museums for years with a particular focus on photography and arts education. When she isn’t writing, she enjoys hiking, film photography, and studying law while cuddling with her cat Georgia.
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