Stunning Drone Video Captures Sweeping Views of the Ancient Ruins of Pompeii

If you ever wondered what life was like in ancient Rome, a visit to Pompeii will give you a deeper understanding of daily life. Located outside of Naples, the bustling town was preserved after being buried under volcanic ash during the 79 AD eruption of Mount Vesuvius.

Thanks to Roman archaeologist Steven Ellis, it's possible to preview the archeological site without having to step foot on an airplane. The quick drone video does a fly by through one of Pompeii's main thoroughfares, sweeping up for a glimpse of the ominous volcano.

If you're curious about the raised blocks that appear on the stone road, they actually served a practical purpose. In Pompeii, the streets functioned as drainage channels and a sewage system. The blocks allowed pedestrians to cross the road while keeping themselves clean, and the raised stones have just enough space so that carts and carriages could pass unencumbered.

Since Pompeii was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1997, there have been concerns about its state of conservation. Its enormous size coupled with a myriad of problems related to weather deterioration, vandalism, and a lack of funding for conservation have raised red flags. In fact, the site has been at risk of landing on UNESCO's World Heritage in Danger list. Luckily, there are many Italian and international organizations, such as the Pompeii Sustainable Preservation Project, that are working to keep the site in good condition.

h/t: [Laughing Squid]

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Jessica Stewart

Jessica Stewart is a Contributing Writer and Digital Media Specialist for My Modern Met, as well as a curator and art historian. She earned her MA in Renaissance Studies from University College London and now lives in Rome, Italy. She cultivated expertise in street art which led to the purchase of her photographic archive by the Treccani Italian Encyclopedia in 2014. When she’s not spending time with her three dogs, she also manages the studio of a successful street artist. In 2013, she authored the book 'Street Art Stories Roma' and most recently contributed to 'Crossroads: A Glimpse Into the Life of Alice Pasquini'. You can follow her adventures online at @romephotoblog.

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