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Partially Hand-Stitched Photos Visualize the Past Boundaries of the Berlin Wall

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Brandenburg Gate

November 9, 2019 marked the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. And although there is no longer a physical border between East and West, there is still a strong sense of Berlin’s turbulent past all over the city. LA-based artist Diane Meyer visited the former, 104-mile (160 km) path where the wall once stood. The site inspired her to create a reflective series, simply titled Berlin. For the project, the artist embroidered directly onto 43 of her own photographs with pixel-like cross-stitches that obscure areas previously blocked off by the divide.

Meyer has been working on her Berlin series for the past 7 years, meticulously hand-stitching on top of images that were taken in the city center, as well as the outskirts of the city, throughout suburbs and forests. The artist was particularly interested in photographing locations where there are no visible traces of the wall remaining, but where there are still subtle clues of where it once was.

By merging digital and analog mediums, Meyer emphasizes the unnatural boundaries of the wall itself. From The Brandenburg Gate to Checkpoint Charlie, the embroidered sections of each photo represent the exact scale and location of the former wall. The tactile, stitched areas offer a pixelated view of what’s behind the now-invisible border. “The embroidery appears as a translucent trace in the landscape of something that no longer exists but is a weight on history and memory,” Meyer explains. “I am interested in the porous nature of memory as well the means by which photography transforms history into nostalgic objects that obscure objective understandings of the past.”

Meyer's poignant Berlin series is currently on view at Klompching Gallery in New York until January 10, 2019. Scroll down to see some of the images from the collection and check out more of Meyer's work on her website.

Artist Diane Meyer explores the historical divide of the Berlin Wall in her series of stitched photographs, titled Berlin.

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Checkpoint Charlie

She embroidered directly onto 43 of her own photographs with pixel-like cross-stitches, obscuring areas previously blocked off by the divide.

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Former Guard Tower, Puschkinallee

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Olympiastadion

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Spree Park, a Former DDR Amusement Park

The embroidered sections represent the exact scale and location of the former wall.

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Tegeler Fleiss

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Bernauer Strasse

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Mauer Park

The stitched areas offer a pixelated view of what’s behind the now-invisible border.

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Forest Border Area Near Hohen Neuendorf

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Kieler Strasse

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Basketball Court Park an Nordbahnhof

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Tempelhof

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Former Offices of State Secret Police

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Former Wall Area Between Rudow and Altglienicke

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Ernaberger Strasse

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Grunberger Strasse

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Potsdamer Platz

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

East Side Gallery

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Stairs at Bosebrucke

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Swan Spree Park

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Housing Project, Planterwald

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Former Wall Area, Landwehrkanal

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Treehouse. Former Wall Area, Frohnau

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Sacrower Heilandskirche

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Interrogation Room. Hohenschoenhausen

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Apartments, Markisches Viertal

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Glienicke Bridge

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

House. Former Wall Area Near Lichterfelde Sud

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Mitte Benches

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Greibnitzsee

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Niederkirchnerstrasse

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Reichstag

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Heidelberger Strasse

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Apartment Spandau

Stitched Photographs Berlin Wall by Diane Meyer

Office, Hohenschoenhausen

Diane Meyer: Website | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to feature photos by Diane Meyer.

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Emma Taggart

Emma Taggart is a Contributing Writer at My Modern Met. Originally from Northern Ireland, she is an artist now based in Berlin. After graduating with a BA in Fashion and Textile Design in 2013, Emma decided to combine her love of art with her passion for writing. Emma has contributed to various art and culture publications, with an aim to promote and share the work of inspiring modern creatives. While she writes every day, she’s also devoted to her own creative outlet—Emma hand-draws illustrations and is currently learning 2D animation.

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