Home / Photography / ContestWinners of the 2019 British Wildlife Photography Awards Celebrate Beauty of Local Fauna

Winners of the 2019 British Wildlife Photography Awards Celebrate Beauty of Local Fauna

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2019

“Behind Bars (Grey heron)” by Daniel Trim. Overall winner and Urban Wildlife winner.

For 10 years, the British Wildlife Photography Awards have celebrated the rich ecosystems found across Britain. The 2019 winners take a diverse approach to wildlife photography; but, in their own way, they help pay homage to local fauna and prove that award-winning photography doesn’t require an exotic location.

In celebration of its ten-year anniversary, the competition honors the sea by expanding its Coast and Marine category into four divisions based on the British coastline. By including special awards for Wales, Scotland, England, and Northern Ireland and the Coast of Ireland, the contest hopes to increase conservation awareness. An additional 11 categories, including two youth awards, allow photographers to highlight everything from a garden spider to the dramatic plight of an injured European hedgehog.

Interestingly, the top photograph doesn’t take place in a lush green setting, as one might imagine. Instead, Daniel Trim’s haunting image of a Grey heron in urban London took home the overall award. Hunting for small fish trapped in the cover of a bridge, the bird wades through litter and leaves, as rays of light beam onto its face. Standing behind the grill, it appears to be trapped behind bars. Technically stunning and artistically moving, Trim’s photograph earned him a £5,000 prize.

“Who needs penguins or polar bears when we have puffins and badgers? With so many photographers scouring the globe for exotic megafauna, it’s easy to forget how much wildlife we have in our own small and densely populated backyard,” says zoologist Mark Carwadine, who is part of the judging panel. “Just look up–from behind your desk, the kitchen sink or inside your car–and the chances are you will see a wild creature of one kind or another. A red fox running across a field, a blue tit on the bird table, or a red kite over the motorway. We are very fortunate in having an outstanding biodiversity in this country.”

A traveling exhibition of over 100 images, including the winning and commended entries, is currently on view across Britain. The British Wildlife Photography Awards 10 coffee table book published by Ammonite is also available online and in bookstores across Britain.

2019 is the tenth anniversary of the British Wildlife Photography Awards.

Orb Weaver Photograph

“Garden Spider (Garden spider)” by Alan Smith. Hidden Britain winner.

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2019

“Brighter Skies on the Horizon (Rock dove or feral pigeon)” by Rich Bunce. Habitat winner.

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2019

“Common Swift Skimming The Water (Common Swift)” by Robin Chittenden. Animal Behavior winner.

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2019

“Amongst Emerald Depths (Bluebell; Mare’s Tail)” by Jack Mortimer. Botanical Britain winner.

Award Winning Wildlife Photography

“Welcome to Narnia (European larch)” by Dave Fieldhouse. Wild Wood winner.

Bird Photography from British Wildlife Photography Awards

“In the Spotlight (Razorbill)” by Ollie Teasdale. Under 12 winner.

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2019

“Marbled White In Grass (Marbled White)” by Nicholas Court. Black and White winner.

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2019

“Spiny Starfish” by Jacob Guy. 12-18 Year winner.

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2019

“Peering Through the Darkness (Small-spotted catshark)” by Mark Kirkland. Animal portraits winner.

This year there is a special focus on Britain’s coasts and marine life, with four categories spotlighting this topic.

Jellyfish Photograph from Trevor Rees

“Mauve Stinger” by Trevor Rees. Coast & Marine Northern Ireland and Coast of Ireland Category winner.

Award Winning Marine Photography

“Plaice Face (Plaice)” by Mark Thomas. Coast & Marine Wales winner.

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2019

“Stalked Jellyfish and Rissoa Snail” by Paul Pettitt. Coast & Marine England winner.

Underwater Photography from Scotland

“Seal in Seaweed Garden (Grey seal)” by Alex Mustard. Overall Coast & Marine winner and Coast & Marine Scotland winner.

Paul Sawer’s four-photo series of a Blue Tit won the Seasons category.

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2019

“Seasonal Blue Tit (Blue Tit)” by Paul Sawer. British Seasons winner.

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2019

“Seasonal Blue Tit (Blue Tit)” by Paul Sawer. British Seasons winner.

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2019

“Seasonal Blue Tit (Blue Tit)” by Paul Sawer. British Seasons winner.

Bird Photography

“Seasonal Blue Tit (Blue Tit)” by Paul Sawer. British Seasons winner.

The plight and recovery of a European hedgehog took home the top prize in the Documentary series category.

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2019

“Britain’s Most Loved Mammal (European Hedgehog)” by Lawrie Brailey. Documentary Series winner.

British Wildlife Photography Awards 2019

“Britain’s Most Loved Mammal (European Hedgehog)” by Lawrie Brailey. Documentary Series winner.

Wildlife Photography Documentary Series

“Britain’s Most Loved Mammal (European Hedgehog)” by Lawrie Brailey. Documentary Series winner.

Wildlife Photography Documentary Series

“Britain’s Most Loved Mammal (European Hedgehog)” by Lawrie Brailey. Documentary Series winner.

Documentary Photography of Wildlife

“Britain’s Most Loved Mammal (European Hedgehog)” by Lawrie Brailey. Documentary Series winner.

Documentary Photography of Wildlife

“Britain’s Most Loved Mammal (European Hedgehog)” by Lawrie Brailey. Documentary Series winner.

British Wildlife Photography Awards: Website | Facebook | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to feature photos from British Wildlife Photography Awards. 

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