Mind-Boggling Shadow Art from Trash Sculptures

British artists Tim Noble and Sue Webster are a creative team known for their experimental art including these mind-boggling light and shadow sculptures. The duo forms abstract works from, which upon first glance, look like nothing other than straightforward piles of trash. The excitement for the viewer comes when a single light illuminates the pile and creates an entirely new piece of art–usually portraits of themselves–formed with the combination of light and shadow projected onto the wall.

Throughout their careers, the artists have, "played with the idea of how humans perceive abstract images and define them with meaning. The result is surprising and powerful as it redefines how abstract forms can transform into figurative ones." In addition to these shadow sculptures, the team also creates neon light pieces that reference pop culture and flash messages of "everlasting love and hate."









Tim Noble and Sue Webster's website
via [Wicked Game]





December 2, 2016

Sexy French Farmers Pose for Shirtless 2017 Calendar

Last year, the holiday season was set ablaze by France’s Pompiers Sans Frontières (Firefighters Without Borders) and their sizzling, stripped-down calendar. Shot for a good cause by renowned Paris-based fashion photographer Fred Goudon, the risqué calendar proved to be a popular Christmas gift—both in France and abroad. In keeping with tradition, Goudon has photographed a new crop of au naturel pin-up models for his 2018 edition: French farmers.

Read Article


December 1, 2016

Meticulous Landscape Paintings Beautifully Represent Intangible Emotional States

Artist Crystal Liu intimately ties her emotional states to beautiful abstract paintings. In large-scale works, she constructs landscapes that are metaphors for the intangible forces that drive us. Visually, elements of the Earth and sky are the actors for the feelings we cannot easily imagine. Together, the sun, mountains, and more depict “narratives of conflict, entrapment, longing, and precarious hope.” These symbols allow Liu to seem removed, yet make the pieces deeply personal.

Read Article


Get Our Weekly Newsletter