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Suspended Layers of Colorful “Pixels” in Ancient Greek Ruins

Colorful Installation Art in Ancient Greek Ruin by Quintessenz

Installation in old stone house, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)

Hanover and Berlin-based artists Thomas Granseuer and Tomislav Topic (together known as Quintessenz) create site-specific installation art made from a combination of materials. For their latest project, the duo transformed a derelict stone building on the Greek island of Paxos as part of the Paxos Contemporary Art Project. The 400-year-old ruin was filled with layers of colorful spray-painted fabric, creating an abstract spectrum of rainbow hues.

This latest piece references some of Quintessenz’s previous works, including the Paradis Perdus (2017) installation in Les Baux-de-Provence, France, as well as Flickering Lights (2018), created for Panorama Fashion Week in Berlin. For each installation, the creative duo cut pieces of the colored, mesh-like fabric into geometric shapes and suspended them in grids and rows. When viewed together, the fabric seems to blur and merge into soft gradients that look like digital pixels, contrasted against the old, gray stone buildings. The floating fabric changes depending on the observer’s movement and the location’s natural elements, challenging the viewer’s perception of the space.

Although Quintessenz’s installations look incredible when captured on camera, the duo’s distinctive works are always best viewed in person. The artists explain, “We hope that the visitors of our work leave their mobile phone cameras in their pockets for a moment and simply enjoy the light and the translation of the wind in the material.”

You can catch the Paxos Contemporary Art Project until September 9, 2018, and see more of Quintessenz’s installations on their website and Instagram.

Artists Thomas Granseuer and Tomislav Topic (together known as Quintessenz) filled a 400-year-old Greek ruin with suspended layers of colorful spray-painted fabric.

Colorful Installation Art in Ancient Greek Ruin by Quintessenz

Installation in old stone house, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)

The project is part of the island’s Paxos Contemporary Art Project.

Colorful Installation Art in Ancient Greek Ruin by Quintessenz

Installation in old stone house, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)

The vivid spectrum of rainbow hues seem to blur and merge into soft gradients that look like digital pixels, contrasted against the old, gray stone building.

Colorful Installation Art in Ancient Greek Ruin by Quintessenz

Installation in old stone house, Kagkatika for Paxos Contemporary Art Project (2018)

This project references the duo’s previous rainbow-hued projects.

Colorful Installation Art in Ancient Greek Ruin by Quintessenz

“Paradis Perdus” (2017), Les Baux-de-Provence, France

Colorful Installation Art in Ancient Greek Ruin by Quintessenz

“Paradis Perdus” (2017), Les Baux-de-Provence, France

Colorful Installation Art in Ancient Greek Ruin by Quintessenz

“Paradis Perdus” (2017), Les Baux-de-Provence, France

Colorful Installation Art in Ancient Greek Ruin by Quintessenz

“Flickering Lights” (2018), created for Panorama Fashion Week in Berlin

Colorful Installation Art in Ancient Greek Ruin by Quintessenz

“Flickering Lights” (2018), created for Panorama Fashion Week in Berlin

Colorful Installation Art in Ancient Greek Ruin by Quintessenz

“Flickering Lights” (2018), created for Panorama Fashion Week in Berlin

Quintessenz: Website | Facebook | Instagram | Vimeo
h/t: [Colossal]

All images via Quintessenz.

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Emma Taggart

Emma Taggart is a Contributing Writer at My Modern Met. Originally from Northern Ireland, she is an artist now based in Berlin. After graduating with a BA in Fashion and Textile Design in 2013, Emma decided to combine her love of art with her passion for writing. Emma has contributed to various art and culture publications, with an aim to promote and share the work of inspiring modern creatives. While she writes every day, she’s also devoted to her own creative outlet—Emma hand-draws illustrations and is currently learning 2D animation.

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