Home / ArtKnitted Animal Dissections Turn Squeamish Scenes Into Cute Cruelty-Free Displays

Knitted Animal Dissections Turn Squeamish Scenes Into Cute Cruelty-Free Displays

Knitted Animal Anatomy Kits by Emily Stoneking

This post may contain affiliate links. If you make a purchase, My Modern Met may earn an affiliate commission. Please read our disclosure for more info.

Each year, hundreds of animals are dissected in school biology classes in order to analyze the structure and function of their innards. If you’re an animal lover, you might remember fearing the grim, unethical experience and ultimately being put off a career in science. However, textile artist Emily Stoneking (of aKNITomy) shows that learning about anatomy doesn’t have to be all blood and guts. She creates knitted dissections of frogs, mice, bats, and other creatures that are a lot more pleasant than the real deal.

“I’m not a scientist, but I play one on the internet,” says Stoneking. “I am also interested in using cuddly materials (like cozy knitting) to create objects that many people are usually squeamish about.” Stoneking is inspired by the history of medicine—especially 19th century biological illustrations in old science books. “I wish I had the fine line drawing skills to be able to create anatomical illustrations like the ones that have long inspired me, but alas, I can’t really draw. But I can knit! So wooly illustrations it’ll have to be!”

Stoneking sells her knitted creations on Etsy, where many come playfully pinned on real dissection trays. Each piece is either hand-knitted or needle-felted using soft materials such as wool, mohair, and silk blends. Although Stoneking admits that her fuzzy creations aren’t totally anatomically correct, she continues to improve her craft each day. “I take a lot of artistic liberties,” she reveals. “I do spend a lot of time researching real anatomical structures, and my guts have evolved over time (they used to be pretty blobby and random). But now, they really look very human, which I have found people tend to gravitate to.”

Take a look at Stoneking’s knitted dissections below. If you’re a fan of her work, you can buy from her collection on Etsy. The talented textile artist even sells DIY animal anatomy kits for those who are interested in crafting their own.

Textile artist Emily Stoneking creates knitted dissections of animals that show learning about anatomy doesn’t have to be all blood and guts.

Knitted Animal Anatomy Kits by Emily StonekingKnitted Animal Anatomy Kits by Emily Stoneking

Each piece is hand-made using soft materials such as wool, mohair, and silk blends.

Knitted Animal Anatomy Kits by Emily StonekingKnitted Animal Anatomy Kits by Emily StonekingKnitted Animal Anatomy Kits by Emily StonekingKnitted Animal Anatomy Kits by Emily StonekingKnitted Animal Anatomy Kits by Emily Stoneking

Many pieces are playfully pinned on real dissection trays.

Knitted Animal Anatomy Kits by Emily StonekingKnitted Animal Anatomy Kits by Emily StonekingKnitted Animal Anatomy Kits by Emily StonekingKnitted Animal Anatomy Kits by Emily StonekingEmily Stoneking / aKNITomy: Etsy | Facebook
h/t: [Mother Nature Network]

All images via Emily Stoneking / aKNITomy.

Related Articles:

Embroidered Anatomy Brooches Celebrate the Beauty of Human Life

Beautiful Floral Anatomy Illustrations Give New Life to Discarded Pages of Old Books

Amazing Paper Bird Sculptures Reveal Their Internal Anatomy

Viral Image of Human Milk Ducts Is Blowing People’s Minds About Female Anatomy

Emma Taggart

Emma Taggart is a Contributing Writer at My Modern Met. Originally from Northern Ireland, she is an artist now based in Berlin. After graduating with a BA in Fashion and Textile Design in 2013, Emma decided to combine her love of art with her passion for writing. Emma has contributed to various art and culture publications, with an aim to promote and share the work of inspiring modern creatives. While she writes every day, she’s also devoted to her own creative outlet—Emma hand-draws illustrations and is currently learning 2D animation.

Want to become a My Modern Met Member?

Find out how by becoming a Patron. Check out the exclusive rewards, here.

Sponsored Content