Wooden Infinite Loop Installation Invites Public to Lounge and Play All at Once

Infinite Loop Hong Kong Art Installation

All images © Kris Provoost

Known for its innovative designs that challenge the limits of technology and materials, Paul Cocksedge Studio is an internationally acclaimed design firm that focuses on “simplicity and imagination in order to create unique people-centered designs.” In May, the Studio completed one of its latest projects—a public art installation titled Time Loop—in partnership with Sino Group, one of the most prominent property developers in Hong Kong. A monumental infinite loop fabricated from sustainably sourced timber, the sculpture sits in Yue Man Square—a central public area in the Kwun Tong district of Hong Kong.

Time Loop is a gift from Sino Group to the Kwun Tong community in commemoration of the company’s 50th anniversary and five decades of community building. Inspired by the surrounding square and its history, its curving form harks back to the infinity symbol and is intended to reflect the area’s continuous growth and transformation over the last half century. The installation is “a gesture towards both the past and the future a mark of respect for Hong Kong’s history as well as a celebration of its constant change and pace of life.”

Though Time Loop itself is a static piece, its form—sloping into infinite loops—is an expression of that motion and change. This sentiment is further expressed by an “infinite” poem, engraved on the sides of the sculpture in two different languages, whose words reflect on the passage of time. Its interconnected rings also frame the views of surrounding architecture, creating new and ever-changing perspectives of its encompassing neighborhood.

A public art installation, Time Loop is intended to provide a space for community members to sit, reflect, and appreciate their surroundings—a place where people can gather, interact, rest, and also play. That sense of community is a central influence in its design and elevates the piece from merely a work of art to a living entity that—like its historic surroundings—is constantly evolving and changing.

“I can’t wait to see the human form bringing life to the artwork,” Cocksedge reveals. “When people sit on Time Loop they become part of the movement of the city, as well as its transformation. It reflects a place that’s endured for many years, but remains constantly moving and evolving. And that’s the symbolism of the form.”

Scroll down to see images of Paul Cocksedge Studio’s Hong Kong art installation Time Loop. To see more of their incredible work, visit the Studio’s website or follow them on Instagram.

In partnership with Sino Group, Paul Cocksedge Studio created a public art installation titled Time Loop in Hong Kong's Kwun Tong district.

Time Loop Public Art Installation by Paul Cocksedge StudiosInfinite Loop Hong Kong Art InstallationTime Loop Public Art Installation by Paul Cocksedge StudiosTime Loop Public Art Installation by Paul Cocksedge Studios

Time Loop is a gift from Sino Group to the Kwun Tong community in commemoration of the company’s 50th anniversary, and it's meant to be a space where the community can interact.

Infinite Loop Hong Kong Art InstallationTime Loop Public Art Installation by Paul Cocksedge StudiosInfinite Loop Hong Kong Art InstallationTime Loop Public Art Installation by Paul Cocksedge Studios

The piece's infinite loops are meant to embody the continuous change and motion of its surrounding environment, and its sides are engraved with an “infinite” poem that reflects on the passage of time.

Infinite Loop Hong Kong Art InstallationTime Loop Public Art Installation by Paul Cocksedge StudiosTime Loop Public Art Installation by Paul Cocksedge StudiosInfinite Loop Hong Kong Art Installation

Paul Cocksedge Studio: Website | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

My Modern Met granted permission to feature photos by Paul Cocksedge Studio.

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Arnesia Young

Arnesia Young is a contributing writer for My Modern Met and an aspiring art historian. She holds a BA in Art History and Curatorial Studies with a minor in Design from Brigham Young University. With a love and passion for the arts, culture, and all things creative, she finds herself intrigued by the creative process and is constantly seeking new ways to explore and understand it.
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