Home / Art / Painting / Edward Hopper-Inspired Paintings Explore the Mysterious Beauty of Modern Urban Nightlife

Edward Hopper-Inspired Paintings Explore the Mysterious Beauty of Modern Urban Nightlife

Nighttime Landscape Painting

“Night Gazers,” 2019, oil on linen 72 x 96 inches. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery.

Artist Keita Morimoto captures the often overlooked beauty of nocturnal life in his series titled Garden of Light. The alluring paintings are set against the backdrop of the artist’s home in Canada and are inspired by the instances of kaleidoscopic color that appear after dark. “My recent interest was to explore whether it’s possible to capture a feeling of urban spaces with the use of figures that echo a sense of city lights and colors,” Morimoto explains in a statement, “while simultaneously depicting a sense of populating and inhabiting with or without figures within the city.”

Morimoto is particularly intrigued by the sense of secrecy and quiet that the evening brings, and he uses it as the stage for his enigmatic subjects. “While every figure is nearly being fused into the urban spaces,” Morimoto writes, “all the figures I’ve chosen in this series who are still all peers of mine seem to me that they display expressions of both ambivalence and tranquility.”

The series’ namesake piece is a stunning eighteen-foot triptych of downtown Toronto. Although the painting is designed as a continuous panorama, each section shows Toronto at a different time of the day. Its all-encompassing view sets the foundation for the series while the other paintings delve into more intimate scenes and portraits—including several works that are a nod to Edward Hopper’s masterpiece, Nighthawks. Morimoto’s Night Gazers, for example, references Hopper’s painting directly and shows three figures in front of a grocery store—seemingly caught in between purpose and boredom.

Scroll down to see more paintings from Morimoto’s Garden of Light, and follow the artist on Instagram to keep up to date with his latest creations.

Toronto-based artist Keita Morimoto explores the vibrancy of nocturnal life in his nighttime landscape paintings.

Keita Morimoto Garden of Light Paintings

“Midnight Garden,” 2019, oil on linen, 60 x 60 inches. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery.

Keita Morimoto Garden of Light Paintings

“Wanderers,” 2019, oil on linen, 50 x 125 inches. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery.

The series is entitled Garden of Light, and it includes different scenes of urban life.

Keita Morimoto Garden of Light Paintings

“Garden of Light,” triptych, 2019, oil on panel 96 x 216 inches. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery.

Keita Morimoto Garden of Light Paintings

“Past and Future,” 2019, oil on linen, 48 x 60 inches. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery.

Keita Morimoto Garden of Light Paintings

“Reflection,” 2019, oil on linen, 48 x 60 inches. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery.

In particular, Morimoto’s artwork emphasizes the beauty of artificial light.

Nighttime Landscape Painting

“Portal,” 2019, oil on panel, 30 x 36 inches. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery.

Nighttime Landscape Paintin

“Homecoming,” 2019, oil on linen, 48 x 60 inches. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery.

Oil Landscape Painting

“Chromatic City,” 2019, oil on panel, 30 x 36 inches. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery.

Oil Landscape Painting

“Light City,” 2019, oil on linen, 42 x 72 inches. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery.

Keita Morimoto Garden of Light Paintings

“Green City,” 2019, oil on linen, 42 x 72 inches. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery.

Keita Morimoto Garden of Light Paintings

“Orange City,” 2019, oil on linen, 42 x 72 inches. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery.

Keita Morimoto Garden of Light Paintings

“Transitional,” 2019, oil on panel, 12 x 24 inches. Courtesy of Nicholas Metivier Gallery.

Keita Morimoto: Website | Instagram

My Modern Met granted permission to feature photos by Keita Morimoto.

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Margherita Cole

Margherita Cole is a Contributing Writer at My Modern Met and illustrator based in Southern California. She holds a BA in Art History with a minor in Studio Art from Wofford College, and an MA in Illustration: Authorial Practice from Falmouth University in the UK. When she’s not writing, Margherita continues to develop her creative practice in sequential art.

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